Categories
Customer Trust Trust

Do your customers trust you?

Do your customers trust you?
For me, trust has always been one of the most, if not the most important factor in any relationship with clients.  Whenever undertaking any sales training and running through the most important qualities of anyone working in sales, trust invariably comes out on top.
This time the issue is about the Charity sector and a Mr Rae who forgot to tick a box when he filled out a lifestyle survey in 1994.  It seems that the company behind the survey sold his personal information to charities which then bombarded him with requests for donations and some then proceeded to pass on Mr Rae’s personal information to other charities, data brokers and companies – over 200 times in total and resulted in him being scammed as well. No-one deserves this and the Data Protection Act is very clear – the very first principle is that your data is only processed fairly and lawfully.
Again, it comes down to trust and expectation and not simply down to the fact that 20 years ago Mr Rae didn’t tick the box to say ‘don’t share my information with ‘like-minded’ companies’. An interesting discussion yesterday on R.4 commented that part of the issue was too much short term thinking and too high targets for the sales team on the phone and a lack of understanding that the charity/donor relationship is very much long term and very much dependent on trust.  It is critical for donors not to feel bad if they can’t up their giving. Every donor should be encouraged to give to their comfort level but never beyond, they should never be made to feel guilty. This is a negative emotion and not at all productive.
So this then leads into emotion v logic not being understood, and perhaps processes in the business not being as robust as they might be. Are yours sound in your business?  Are there any that could lead to customers or clients feeling that you are not being transparent and perhaps not worthy of their trust?
I love getting process right. Call me if I can help.
3rd September 2015

Categories
Brand Customer Engagement Customer Loyalty

Customer Loyalty – What A Goldfish Can Teach You

Customer Loyalty – What A Goldfish Can Teach You

I loved this article about customer loyalty written by David Edelman, McKinsey partner leading Digital Marketing Strategy Practice.

Not only is it great for customer loyalty,  but it’s also a great example of customer engagement.  The whole sales process has turned on its head and once you have that contract signed and delivered the goods or service, then it’s really only the start of your customer engagement journey.
You then want to have given your client/customer such an amazing customer journey and experience that he/she tells all his/her friends about it.  This idea of a goldfish, if wanted, in your hotel bedroom, is neat on many counts – original,  simple and authentic.  It’s unexpected and will naturally encourage people to write about in on their various social media blogs/posts. It won’t break the bank.  Great ROI I imagine too.
So what does it take to get to this?  A great team, brainstorming, lateral thinking, perhaps an outside influence and sounding board?  What do you think?

Customer Loyalty
Customer Loyalty
Categories
Armstrong Beech Marketing Customer Feedback Customer Journey Customer Loyalty Value

Do your customers feel valued?

OK then, it’s Valentine’s Day next week; don’t just keep this day for your loved ones, but think about your special customers in your business too..
man with gift iStock_000014527125XSmall
When did you last tell them they were valued? Last week, last month, last year?      Scary stats for why people stop buying from businesses (quite a few variations here but this is the ‘average’):
1% die.
3% move away.
5% follow a friend’s or relative’s recommendation.
9% find an alternative they perceive to be better quality or value.
14% are dissatisfied with the products or services.
And a massive 68% of people leave a business because of… indifference.
They take their business elsewhere simply because they do not feel valued.
Since you spend a lot of time, money, and effort to get a visitor to your business, if you let them leave because of indifference, you might as well be flushing £20 notes away.
Do you know what your customers think of you/your business and service/product?  If you haven’t asked them recently, maybe now is the time to do that survey that’s been on your ROUND TUIT list.  It’s such a great way to get feedback, build your testimonials and ask for word of mouth recommendations.  If you would find it difficult to ask such questions of your customers, then I’m sure I know someone who would be delighted to undertake this for you – just call…
Customers love it when you
Customers love it when you

  • know them, remember them by name and remember their preferences;
  • make it easy for your customers to do business with you;
  • treat them with respect and make them feel special;
  • treat your 20% VIP customers like royalty (more about your 20% in my Pareto article);
  • let them know you’re accountable when problems arise;
  • ensure they  know they can communicate with a live person;
  • deliver what you say by when you promise it and on the first time of asking; even      better would be to deliver ahead of time;
  • anticipate their needs, even before they do;
  • sort any problems that arise promptly and efficiently;
  • make offers clear and transparent so that customers don’t feel ‘cheated’ by not      getting exactly what they thought they were going to get;
  • grow with them;
  • and let them know they are valued.

 

Categories
Armstrong Beech Marketing Customer Journey Customer Loyalty Marketing

The "Wow" Factor – have you got it?

Turning a customer with a complaint into one of your biggest fans:
The Wow Factor-have you got it?
Things do go wrong and most people are reasonable if a complaint is handled well. Handle it
really well and you have a fan for life.
When working in the mobile ‘phone industry, many things were out of our control and
sometimes things did go wrong but I never lost a customer because of it and instead they
always became my most loyal customers. Why? I told them how it was; what we were doing about it; kept in touch with them and eventually sorted it.   

Categories
Communications Marketing Seth Godin

Whose job is "marketing" in your office?

From my newsletter 25th May 2012
Just the people with marketing in their job title or ????
What about the person answering your calls – the first contact with your clients and prospects.  First impressions, good call handling all very important. And the first contact in your office for visitors.  Certainly part of marketing.  And it’s at this initial point it is SO easy to enquire ‘may I ask whether you were recommended to us or xxxxx” This information is absolutely critical to focus efforts and test and measure expenditure on promotions.
Then how the call is handled, the enquiry dealt with, the information sent back to client/prospect. That’s all critical too in the customer journey.