Categories
Customer Trust Trust

Do your customers trust you?

Do your customers trust you?
For me, trust has always been one of the most, if not the most important factor in any relationship with clients.  Whenever undertaking any sales training and running through the most important qualities of anyone working in sales, trust invariably comes out on top.
This time the issue is about the Charity sector and a Mr Rae who forgot to tick a box when he filled out a lifestyle survey in 1994.  It seems that the company behind the survey sold his personal information to charities which then bombarded him with requests for donations and some then proceeded to pass on Mr Rae’s personal information to other charities, data brokers and companies – over 200 times in total and resulted in him being scammed as well. No-one deserves this and the Data Protection Act is very clear – the very first principle is that your data is only processed fairly and lawfully.
Again, it comes down to trust and expectation and not simply down to the fact that 20 years ago Mr Rae didn’t tick the box to say ‘don’t share my information with ‘like-minded’ companies’. An interesting discussion yesterday on R.4 commented that part of the issue was too much short term thinking and too high targets for the sales team on the phone and a lack of understanding that the charity/donor relationship is very much long term and very much dependent on trust.  It is critical for donors not to feel bad if they can’t up their giving. Every donor should be encouraged to give to their comfort level but never beyond, they should never be made to feel guilty. This is a negative emotion and not at all productive.
So this then leads into emotion v logic not being understood, and perhaps processes in the business not being as robust as they might be. Are yours sound in your business?  Are there any that could lead to customers or clients feeling that you are not being transparent and perhaps not worthy of their trust?
I love getting process right. Call me if I can help.
3rd September 2015

Categories
Brand Customer Engagement Customer Loyalty

Customer Loyalty – What A Goldfish Can Teach You

Customer Loyalty – What A Goldfish Can Teach You

I loved this article about customer loyalty written by David Edelman, McKinsey partner leading Digital Marketing Strategy Practice.

Not only is it great for customer loyalty,  but it’s also a great example of customer engagement.  The whole sales process has turned on its head and once you have that contract signed and delivered the goods or service, then it’s really only the start of your customer engagement journey.
You then want to have given your client/customer such an amazing customer journey and experience that he/she tells all his/her friends about it.  This idea of a goldfish, if wanted, in your hotel bedroom, is neat on many counts – original,  simple and authentic.  It’s unexpected and will naturally encourage people to write about in on their various social media blogs/posts. It won’t break the bank.  Great ROI I imagine too.
So what does it take to get to this?  A great team, brainstorming, lateral thinking, perhaps an outside influence and sounding board?  What do you think?

Customer Loyalty
Customer Loyalty
Categories
Armstrong Beech Marketing Customer Feedback Customer Journey Customer Loyalty Value

Do your customers feel valued?

OK then, it’s Valentine’s Day next week; don’t just keep this day for your loved ones, but think about your special customers in your business too..
man with gift iStock_000014527125XSmall
When did you last tell them they were valued? Last week, last month, last year?      Scary stats for why people stop buying from businesses (quite a few variations here but this is the ‘average’):
1% die.
3% move away.
5% follow a friend’s or relative’s recommendation.
9% find an alternative they perceive to be better quality or value.
14% are dissatisfied with the products or services.
And a massive 68% of people leave a business because of… indifference.
They take their business elsewhere simply because they do not feel valued.
Since you spend a lot of time, money, and effort to get a visitor to your business, if you let them leave because of indifference, you might as well be flushing £20 notes away.
Do you know what your customers think of you/your business and service/product?  If you haven’t asked them recently, maybe now is the time to do that survey that’s been on your ROUND TUIT list.  It’s such a great way to get feedback, build your testimonials and ask for word of mouth recommendations.  If you would find it difficult to ask such questions of your customers, then I’m sure I know someone who would be delighted to undertake this for you – just call…
Customers love it when you
Customers love it when you

  • know them, remember them by name and remember their preferences;
  • make it easy for your customers to do business with you;
  • treat them with respect and make them feel special;
  • treat your 20% VIP customers like royalty (more about your 20% in my Pareto article);
  • let them know you’re accountable when problems arise;
  • ensure they  know they can communicate with a live person;
  • deliver what you say by when you promise it and on the first time of asking; even      better would be to deliver ahead of time;
  • anticipate their needs, even before they do;
  • sort any problems that arise promptly and efficiently;
  • make offers clear and transparent so that customers don’t feel ‘cheated’ by not      getting exactly what they thought they were going to get;
  • grow with them;
  • and let them know they are valued.

 

Categories
Armstrong Beech Marketing Social Media

Google+: The benefits for business

Posted by Neil Davey in Marketing & PR on Wed, 03/08/2011 – 10:00

 is reporting “insane demand” for its new Google+ social network. But what does the latest platform on the block mean for businesses? Neil Davey investigates. 

Google may have left many underwhelmed with its last two social initiatives, Wave and Buzz, but this track record did little to quell the excitement that heralded the launch of its new social network, Google+.

Categories
Armstrong Beech Marketing Email

3 Ways to Maintain Your Growing Email List

All lists need a little upkeep to stay healthy and keep communications relevant

by Pamela Adams2,  Constant Contact Regional Development Director, Georgia

How is a permission-based email list like a Philodendron plant3? You want both to grow in size and expand their reach. And, like a Philodendron, a growing email list4 needs some care and maintenance along the way to ensure healthy growth continues. Giving a little TLC to your list also helps reinforce that you’re continuing to send relevant information to each of your subscribers.

Here are three surefire ways for maintaining a healthy email list:

1. Segment your list

When you have a larger list and send everything to everyone, you’re basically doing what my friend calls “spraying and praying.” You’re playing the numbers game and hoping that more people will open your messages. In reality creating smaller, targeted lists gets your better results. Letting subscribers choose which list they want to be on allows them to tell you what they want to hear, and it means you can send more relevant emails to those who want to receive them. A few examples of how business or organizations could segment their lists:

  • Nonprofits could have separate lists targeting members, donors, volunteers, and board of directors.
  • A clothing retailer could offer mailings targeting those interested in men’s, women’s, or children’s apparel.
  • Restaurants that offer live music on the weekend could segment their lists by those interested in only dinner specials and those interested in the musical acts.
  • A travel agent could offer an email on tropical vacations, ski packages, or vacations with kids.

You can choose which lists are available for subscribers on your Join My Mailing List and email preference page (e.g., a nonprofit wouldn’t want to have the board of directors list open to the public). Other options include segmenting your list by anniversary or birthday month, or by how often subscribers want to hear from you (e.g., weekly, monthly, quarterly).

If you’ve already got a big list (good for you!) that you want to segment, you can let subscribers know about the new options in upcoming campaigns and ask them to click the Update Profile/Email Address link at the bottom of your message to see and select which available lists they’d like to be added to. You can also put a copy of the Update Profile link in the body of your email5 to make it a more obvious call to action.

2. Prune the bounces

Every time you mail a message, there are going to be a few that get bounced back because the email address is no longer valid, has a typo in it, the recipient’s inbox could be full, or the person has an out-of-office responder activated. Take a look at your bounce report6 to see why the message is being returned. For the vacationers, you can ignore the report. But for hard bounces such as a non-existent addresses, you should:

  • Verify the address is correct. If it is and you think the report is a false positive7, you can always follow-up with the subscriber individually to see if she is actually receiving your message.
  • For those that are truly non-existent, move them to your Do Not Mail list. Doing so will eliminate the subscriber from future mailings, help lower your bounce rate, and improve your open rate. You may also save a few dollars since you won’t be paying for a contact that isn’t getting your emails in the first place.

3. Trim those who don’t engage

There are two schools of thought on trimming your list. Some say if a subscriber hasn’t opened your email in over a year, delete them from your list8 and watch as your open rates rise.

However, I am a believer that if people don’t ask to be taken off your list, you leave them where they are as you never know when someone is going to re-engage and potentially become a customer or donor. You can also conduct a specific re-engagement campaign9 to encourage those quiet subscribers to become active again. The decision to trim or not to trim is yours.

The goals of pruning, segmenting, and trimming are to keep your list clean and to enable you to keep sending relevant content to those subscribers who are interested in specific categories or types of information. No matter which routes you take, delivering winning content to your subscribers will keep them on your list and engaged with your messages longer.

 

March 2011