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Business Growth Entrepreneur Leadership/Management Marketing Strategy Self limiting beliefs Talks Trust

Boldness in Business – Lord Karan Bilimoria, Founder and Chairman Cobra Beer

Boldness in Business  – Lord Karan Bilimoria, Founder and Chairman Cobra Beer
The first in the 2017 UWE Distinguished Address Series was from Lord Karan Bilimoria, Founder and Chairman of Cobra Beer on 25 January 2017.  The idea of Cobra beer evolved from combining the refreshment you get from lager with the smoothness of ale without leaving a bloated feeling; particularly good to accompany Indian food.  A simple big idea.  Cobra Beer now has won 88 gold medals. It is ingenious because it is less gaseous and is still a very fledgling beer of only 25 years! (Think Kronenbourg 1664!).  Not being a great lager/beer drinker myself, I tried it and I was pleasantly surprised.  Will be on the shopping list!
Lord Bilimoria’s lecture covered many aspects of being bold in business….. Here’s some of his thoughts on how to succeed.

Cobra Beer
Cobra Beer

How to succeed in business

  • You need boldness, creativity and restless innovation; boldness to adapt or die and the ability to persevere against all odds,  even when nobody thinks you stand a chance, including your own family.
  • You need vision “to aspire to and achieve against all odds with integrity”.
  • You need to Inspire people to become loyal brand champions
  • You need luck – when determination meets opportunity. Picture waves going past you – you might just catch one if you are lucky
  • Serendipity – seeing what everyone else sees but thinking what no one else has thought
  • Blue ocean thinking eg Cirque de Soleil – bringing together ancient art forms to create a new entertainment. Now a multi- million company
  • You need the guts to do something in the first place and stick with it when the going gets tough
  • Your business is not just what you do but how you do it.
  • Trust is key – Empires were built on trust
  • You need to be a great leader
  • The fear of pain is greater than the pleasure of gain
  • What do you do? play to win or play not to lose?  If you’re already at the top of your league for example, as was Alex Ferguson’s team, the biggest challenge was to get the team to play to win again
  • You need to deliver a unique and relevant consistent experience
  • You need to deliver extraordinary profits
  • Always hire for attitude rather than for skill
  • “Good judgement comes from experience ; experience comes from bad judgement”  attributed to Dr Kerr L White

To work in partnership and with others you need the same culture and the shared values of Integrity = wholeness . The former Archbishop of Canterbury,  once explained that “integrity” comes from the Latin word “integer” – the whole number,  thus “wholeness”. You cannot practise integrity unless you are whole.
Start your own foundation to give back to society.   Cobra Beer has a joint venture with Belu water where profits are donated to water aid to help transform lives through access to clean water and safe toilets in South Asia.

Categories
Fear of Failure Self limiting beliefs

Brace for impact

Brace for impact

I’ve just read “A street cat named Bob” which is a lovely read – perfect holiday reading  in fact – and the author, James Bowen ,  describes a few occasions when he has done just this, braced himself for impact… for example when he had to report back to the HO of the Big Issue Sales because he had been accused of ‘floating’ by some other Big Issue vendors.   He got a verbal warning; but he thought he would have his permit removed so had put off making this appointment.
Don’t we all do this sometimes?  By how much do we limit ourselves from really achieving our goals and successes by our fear of self limiting beliefs….Huge I imagine.   As always Seth Godin gives his thought very clearly:
“I would imagine that there are certain situations, perhaps involving the martial arts, where bracing for impact is a good idea.
The rest of the time, not so much. If your car is about to hit a tree at thirty miles an hour, or the jet is about to slam into the wall of the Grand Canyon, it’s not altogether clear that tensing all your muscles and preparing to be squashed is going to do you much good at all.
Worse than this, far worse, is that we brace for impact way more often than impact actually occurs. The boss calls us into her office and we brace for impact. The speech is supposed to happen next Friday and we spend a week bracing for impact. All the clenching and imagining and playacting and anxiety—our culture has fooled us into thinking that this is a good thing, that it’s a form of preparation.
It’s not. It’s merely experiencing failure in advance, failure that rarely happens.
When you walk around braced for impact, you’re dramatically decreasing your chances. Your chances to avoid the outcome you fear, your chances to make a difference, and your chances to breathe and connect”.